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Harvard Computer Science is hiring

We are hiring new faculty in CS this year at Harvard - applications encouraged! See the job posting below.


Tenure-track Professor in Computer Science
Harvard University

The Computer Science program at Harvard benefits from its outstanding undergraduate and graduate students, an excellent location, significant industrial collaboration, and substantial support from the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

We invite applications for a position as a tenure-track professor in Computer Science. The appointment is expected to begin on July 1, 2011.

We welcome outstanding applicants in all areas of computer science. We are particularly interested in areas related to machine learning, probabilistic modeling, and artificial intelligence. In terms of applications, areas of interest include computational science, engineering, or the social sciences. We encourage applications from candidates whose research examines computational issues raised by very large data sets or massively parallel processing.

Candidates should have an outstanding research record and a strong commitment to undergraduate teaching and graduate training. Applicants must have completed a Ph.D. by September 1, 2011. Information about Harvard's current faculty, research, and educational programs is available at http://www.seas.harvard.edu/teaching-learning/areas/computer-science

Candidates should send, ideally as a single PDF document, a curriculum vitae, a list of publications, a statement of research and teaching interests, and up to three representative papers to the following email address: cs-search@seas.harvard.edu. In addition, candidates should have at least three letters of reference sent to the above address.

Alternatively, material may also be sent via surface mail to:

CS Search Committee
Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard University
Maxwell Dworkin 153
33 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA 02138

Applications will be reviewed as they are received. For full consideration, applications should be received by December 1, 2010.

Harvard is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer.
Applications from women and minority candidates are strongly encouraged.

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